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HERITAGE CHAIR CURRENT EVENTS

Professor Gene Allen Smith


Dr. Smith is a re-tread from 2013-2014. His credentials are displayed under that tour of duty. Welcome Back, Dr. Smith!!

Dr. Smith’s Syllabi:

HH 386A-5601 - Building a Nation & Navy in the Early Republic

1. Course Description:
This course is a limited chronicle of the United States during its formative years, 1789-1828. It begins with a discussion of the results of the Constitutional Convention in 1787; traces the problems faced by the new federal government, including precedents, finances, expansion, ideological and social cleavages, foreign intrigue, building a navy and fighting wars, and its emergence as a truly independent nation; and culminates with the emergence of the Market Economy, the advancement of Universal White Manhood Suffrage, and the election of the "Hero," Andrew Jackson and Jacksonian Democracy in 1828.

2. Objective of the Course:
The Department of History seeks to educate students in the development of world culture and events and to help students understand historical inquiry so they can think and act as informed and ethical leaders and responsible citizens in a global community. Through an examination of the major events, personalities, and trends in American history the student should: A) be able to demonstrate a knowledge of important factual information concerning American history; B) be able to offer analysis of the importance of events; C) identify major trends and developments in various periods and areas within the time span of the course, and describe them by explaining their major features and lasting impacts; D) evaluate and analyze historical sources and discourse; E) work with primary and secondary sources; F) present evidence-based conclusions about issues and problems within the scope of this course; G) gain an understanding of how the past helps to shape the present and the future; H) develop skills in reading comprehension as well as verbal and written expression of knowledge.


HH 104-3402 - American Naval History

1. Course Description:
This course examines the antecedents, origins, and development of the United States Navy and Marine Corps within the framework of America's growth as a global power. Focus is placed on the peace and wartime roles of U.S. naval forces in American foreign and defense policy and the individuals who commanded naval units and made or exemplified American naval traditions. Coverage for each period of peace begins with an analysis of American interests as understood at the time, perceived challenges to those interests, defense policy developed to protect those interests, and the role of the Navy within that policy. Similarly, the study of each war begins with an analysis of war aims and an assessment of the strategy developed to pursue those aims. Emphasis is then placed on the Navy’s role in that strategy and an evaluation of its success or failures to reach its objectives.

2. Objective of the Course:
Through an examination of the major events, personalities, and trends in American Naval History the student should: A) understand the causes, conduct and consequences of every major war the United States has fought; B) understand and analyze America’s growth as a global power and the Navy’s and Marine Corps’ role in that development; C) identify major trends and developments within the time span of the course, and describe them by explaining their major features and lasting impacts; D) gain an understanding of how the past helps to shape the present and the future; E) develop skills in reading comprehension as well as in verbal and written expressions of knowledge; F) understand concepts inherent to the profession of arms (e.g., doctrine, strategy, operational art, tactics, technology, civil-military relations, combat leadership).

Roger Bailey, PhD

Roger Bailey


Roger Bailey


Employment
2021– Class of 1957 Postdoctoral Fellow of Naval History – US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD
2021 Adjunct Professor of History – US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD

Education
2021 PhD – University of Maryland, College Park, MD
• Special Field: Nineteenth Century US History; Minor Field: Military History
• Adviser: Dr. Richard Bell • Dissertation: “‘The Great Question’: Slavery, Sectionalism, and the U.S. Naval Officer Corps, 1820-1861.”
2019 Graduate Certificate – Munson Institute of American Maritime History, Mystic, CT
2017 MA in History – University of Maryland, College Park, MD
2012 BA in History – College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA
• Summa cum Laude
• Minor: Middle Eastern Studies
• Honors Thesis: “‘Nothing but a Pack of Boys’: Preble’s Boys and the Culture of Honor in the Early Naval Officer Corps, 1798-1825.”

Publications
In Progress
“‘Intercourse of the Most Friendly Nature’: Expansionism, the US Navy, and William Walker’s Invasion of Mexico, 1853-1854,” Journal of the Early Republic. (Revise and resubmit)
Book Reviews
2019 Review of To Master the Boundless Sea: The U.S. Navy, the Marine Environment, and the Cartography of Empire, by Jason W. Smith for The Journal for Maritime Research 21 no. 1-2 (2019), 166-168.
2018 Review of Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution, by Nathaniel Philbrick for History: The Journal of the Historical Association 103 no. 358 (December 2018): 915-917.
2018 Review of The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamar, the Wanderer, and Other Tales of the African Slave Trade, by Jim Jordan for History: Reviews of New Books 46 no. 6 (November 2018): 164-165.
2017 Review of This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy, by Matthew Karp for H-SOUTH, H-Net reviews. (Link)

Other Publications
2022 Freedom: The Struggle for Liberty in America—A Graphic Novel. Washington, DC: American Battlefield Trust. (Forthcoming)
2013 “Too Many Endings: The Story of Stonewall Jackson’s Wounding, Death, and Burials.” Hallowed Ground Magazine, Spring 2013.

Grants & Fellowships
2018-20 Humane Studies Fellowship – Institute for Humane Studies
2019 Henry Belin du Pont Dissertation Fellowship – Hagley Museum & Library
2019 Rear Admiral John D. Hayes Pre-Doctoral Fellowship – US Naval History and Heritage Command
2019 Paul Cuffe Memorial Fellowship – Mystic Seaport Museum
2019 Short-term Research Fellowship – New-York Historical Society
2018 Henry Belin du Pont Research Grant – Hagley Museum & Library
2018 Horace Samuel Merrill Dissertation Award – University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities
2018 James C. Bradford Dissertation Research Fellowship in Naval History – North American Society for Oceanic History
2018 Dissertation Writing Fellowship – University of Maryland Department of History
2018 Cosmos Scholars Award – Cosmos Club Foundation
2017 Exploratory Research Grant – Hagley Museum & Library
2011 John F. Kroeger Memorial Scholarship – College of William & Mary Department of History

Honors & Awards
2020 Clark G. Reynolds Student Paper Award – North American Society for Oceanic History
2018 Outstanding Graduate Assistant Award – University of Maryland Graduate School
2016 Passed with Distinction, Nineteenth Century US History Comprehensive Exam – University of Maryland Department of History
2012 Undergraduate Honors Thesis Award – National Society of the Colonial Dames of America (Virginia Society)
2012 High Honors (Honors Thesis) – College of William & Mary Department of History

Teaching Experience
Adjunct Professor – United States Naval Academy
2021 American Naval History
Graduate Instructor – University of Maryland, College Park
2020 From Sea to Shining Sea: America and the Maritime World
2017 The American Civil War
Graduate Teaching Assistant – University of Maryland, College Park
2018 The Era of the American Revolution
2017 The History of the American Dream
2015-16 Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, & Witches: Famous Trials in US History
2015 Pocketbook Politics: A History of American Buying and Selling
2014 Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
2013 Interpreting American History: 1865 to Present

Other Experience
2016 History and Education Specialist – Civil War Trust, Washington, DC
2015–16 Graduate Research Assistant – Freedmen and Southern Society Project, College Park, MD
2012-14 History and Education Intern – Civil War Trust, Washington, DC

Conferences and Invited Talks
Conference Presentations
2021 “‘Mere Narratives of Facts’: Sectionalism and the Publications of U.S. Naval Officers in the Antebellum Era,” McMullen Naval History Symposium, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Sept. 23. (Accepted)
2021 “Human Cargo: The US Navy and Recaptured Africans,” Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Annual Meeting, Virtual Conference, July 17.
2021 “‘A Free Republic, Like Our Own’: The US Navy and the Colonization Movement in Public Discourse, 1819-1860,” North American Society of Oceanic History Annual Conference, Pensacola, FL, July 9.
2021 “‘Nefarious and Inhuman Traffic’: US Naval Officers, Public Discourse, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade,” Society for Military History Annual Meeting, Norfolk, VA, May 21.
2020 “‘A Free Republic, Like Our Own’: The US Navy and the Colonization Movement in Public Discourse, 1819-1860,” Barnes Club Graduate Student Virtual History Conference, Temple University, Mar. 21.
2019 “Human Cargo: The US Navy and Recaptured Africans,” McMullen Naval History Symposium, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Sept. 20. (Panel organizer: “The US Navy and the Transatlantic Slave Trade”)
2019 “‘Intercourse of the Most Friendly Nature’: Levi D. Slamm and William Walker’s Invasion of Mexico, 1853-1854,” Microhistories of the Civil War Era, Virginia Center for Civil War Studies, Blacksburg, VA, June 1.
2019 “‘Reckless Adventurers’: Filibustering Expeditions and the Navy on American Soil,” North American Society for Oceanic History Annual Conference, New Bedford, MA, May 17.
2019 “Conflicted Constables: The U.S. Navy and William Walker’s Invasion of Mexico, 1853-1854,” Society for Military History Annual Meeting, Columbus, OH, May 10.
2018 “Links in the ‘Great Chain’: U.S. Naval Exploration in South America and Public Discourse, 1851-1861,” North American Society for Oceanic History Annual Conference, St. Charles, MO, May 22.
2017 “Race, Slavery, and Duty: Southern Naval Officers in the 1850s,” McMullen Naval History Symposium, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Sept. 14.
Research Workshops
2021 "'Nefarious and Inhuman Traffic': US Naval Officers and the Transatlantic Slave Trade,” Washington Early American Seminar Series, College Park, MD, Mar. 5.
2020 “‘A Free Republic, Like Our Own’: The US Navy and the Founding of Liberia,” McNeil Center for Early American Studies Brown Bag Seminar, Philadelphia, PA, Feb. 19.
2019 “‘Intercourse of the Most Friendly Nature’: Levi Slamm, the US Navy, and William Walker’s Invasion of Mexico, 1853-1854,” Hagley Museum & Library Brown Bag Series, Wilmington, DE, Aug. 22.
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2018 “Exploration,” University of Maryland Early American Thesis Seminar, College Park, MD, Dec. 13.
Other Participation
2021 Chair & Commentator, “Navies & Empires in the Age of Sail,” McMullen Naval History Symposium, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Sept. 23. (Accepted)
2018 Respondent, “A Spy on the Wall: John Gardiner Jr. and U.S. Foreign Relations in the Atlantic World,” Washington Early American Seminar Series, College Park, MD, Dec. 7.
2017 Respondent, “Ohio Dreams, 1730-1753.” Washington Early American Seminar Series, Mount Vernon, VA, February 24.
2016 Panel Respondent, “The Experience and Memory of Military Conflict,” UMD History Graduate Student Association Conference, College Park, MD, March 4.
2015 Respondent, “Veterans’ Disability, Federalism, and Constitutional Order in the Early United States,” Washington Early American Seminar Series, College Park, MD, Sept. 18.
2014 Moderator, “Minority Engagement in Civil War Studies,” Civil War Trust National Teacher Institute, Atlanta, GA, July 18.
2013 Respondent, “Navigating Nationalism: Asian Commerce and the Construction of the Post-Revolutionary American State,” Washington Early American Seminar Series, College Park, MD, Nov. 1.
Digital & Public History
2021 “A Crisis of Identity: Sectionalism & the U.S. Navy Officer Corps, 1815-1861 With Roger Bailey,” Hagley History Hangout, podcast, Aug. 9. (Link)
2020 “A Free Republic Like Our Own: The United States Navy and the Colonization Movement in Public Discourse, 1819-1860,” NASOH podcast, July 10. (Link)
2020 “The U.S. Navy, the American Colonization Society, and Liberia,” Preble Hall, US Naval Academy Museum, podcast, June 11. (Link)
2020 “The Antebellum Navy and the Filibusters,” Preble Hall, US Naval Academy Museum, podcast, May 4. (Link).
2020 Writer, “Boston Massacre Animated Graphic Novel,” American Battlefield Trust, video. (Link)
2020 Historical consultant, Wodiczko, Krzysztof. Monument. Public video projection. Madison Square Park Conservancy, New York.
2019 “The US Navy and Anglophobia in the Mexican-American War,” Research & Collections News, Hagley Museum & Library, June 17. (Link)
2017 “The War of 1812 in Four Minutes: The Burning of Washington,” Campaign 1776, video. (Link)
2017 “The Battle of York,” Today’s Past, WMUC Digital Radio, College Park, MD, Apr. 27.
2016 “Battle of Sackets Harbor,” Campaign 1776. (Link)
2016 “Navy Day,” Today’s Past, WMUC Digital Radio, College Park, MD, Oct. 13.
2015 “The Civil War in Four Minutes: Naval Tech,” Civil War Trust, video. (Link)
2014 “Steel & Steam: Naval Technology in the Civil War Era,” Civil War Trust. (Link)
2014 “Commerce Raiders: Confederate Privateers and Cruisers in the Civil War,” Civil War Trust. (Link)
2013 “Chancellorsville 360,” Civil War Trust, virtual battlefield tour. (Link)
2013 “Fredericksburg 360,” Civil War Trust, virtual battlefield tour. (Link)

Professional Memberships
Society for Historians of the Early American Republic
Society for Military History
North American Society for Oceanic History
US Naval Institute
International Commission for the History of Oceanography

Doctor Bailey’s Syllabus Below:



HH386C: Slavery and the U.S. Navy
United States Naval Academy
Roger Bailey - Spring 2023


Section 3401
T/R-9, PR211
Updated 1/31/23
Dr. Roger Bailey Email: [email protected]
Office Hours: Tues. 1330-1500, or by appt. Office: Sampson 329

PURPOSE
This course will investigate the U.S. Navy’s complicated and largely-forgotten relationship with slavery from the American Revolution through the Reconstruction Era. The navy found itself reining in slavery’s worst excesses while facilitating its spread—offering freedom to some African Americans while actively hunting down and re-enslaving others. To understand this conflicted story, we’ll trace a saga of piracy, secret proslavery exploring expeditions, military interventions in Africa, countermeasures against illegal invasions of Latin America, and decades of cat and mouse with flamboyant and cruel slave traders. We’ll examine the different reasons that officers chose to break from their closest friends and country to join a Southern rebellion, the Union Navy’s role as a liberating force in the Civil War, and the surprising but short-lived attempt to make the service truly inclusive in its aftermath. As we conduct this investigation, we will explore race, law, culture, science, and war in the most divisive era of American history. In the process, students will learn about the legacy of slavery in America and the context behind today’s debates about who should be memorialized on the navy’s buildings and ships.
This course also seeks to teach the way historians think: the questions they ask, the methods they employ, the way they analyze their findings, and how they present these findings to the public. Students will learn to identify and explain continuity and change over time. HH386C: Slavery and the U.S. Navy United States Naval Academy Roger Bailey - Spring 2023


COURSE OBJECTIVES
By the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Develop and demonstrate proficiency with historical methods such as the evaluation of
primary sources, the assessment of diverse historical interpretations, and the composition
of historical narratives.
2. Think, write, and interpret history critically through the analysis of context, cause and
effect, and change over time.
3. Explain the trends, forces, and individuals that shaped the past as well as the historical
roots of contemporary affairs.
4. Illustrate the diversity of the human experience over time and place.
5. Relate the study of history to the profession of arms.


TEXTS
Williams, Heather Andrea.
American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
Morgan, Kenneth, ed.
Slavery in America: A Reader and Guide. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2005.
Soodalter, Ron.
Hanging Captain Gordon: The Life and Trial of an American Slave Trader. New York: Atria Books, 2006.
Ramold, Steven J.
Slaves, Sailors, Citizens: African Americans in the Union Navy. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2002.
Additional readings provided in Blackboard